The Sunday Reader: Vol. 1 | #32

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On Giving Criticism as a Christian

Eventually, you’ll have to. So here are 8 brief tips to consider before sharpening the ol’ iron.

A Society Without the Psalms

Worth reading. “The Scriptures and specifically the Psalms provide a powerful apologetic for the veracity and necessity of Christian faith. So often our apologetics are propositional, intellectual, and reactive to the currents and trends which besiege the mind of our peers. But what of an apologetic which springs from the aesthetic, the paraenetic, the authoritative reality of what the Psalms say? What of an apologetic which sees that fallen image bearers of God are hungry for the beauty and the clarity which the Psalms embody?“

Parenting Daughters toward Godliness, Not Marriage

Rachel Starke describes her challenges and lessons learned in bringing up a daughter unto the Lord, who may or may not marry in this life. “I won’t promise her a marriage outside of the one John writes about in Revelation.”

The Unattainable Perfectionism of Millenials

As one born in 1984, on the cusp of the cultural trend we call Millennialism, I can relate to some of what is said here. Certainly, there is a great need to apply the depth and grace of Christianity to this demographic.

ABOUT — The Sunday Reader shares articles we've found particularly insightful, thought-provoking, or edifying this week. While not always representing the views of our Pastors and Elders, these selections offer a mix of viewpoints to broaden and frame your understanding of God, Scripture, ourselves, and the world we serve in Christ's name.

The Sunday Reader: Vol. 1 | #31

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Why We Need to Talk About Sin

Our culture tends to shun the idea of sin. Robert Godfrey insists, however, that the Church must not refrain from shedding light on this doctrine, lest we forget the purpose of Christ’s coming.

Can Someone Be Spiritually Healthy and Still Experience Mental Health Challenges?

Brad Hambrick, an Instructor of Biblical Counseling at SBTS, suggests an answer to this complex question.

Ten Lessons for Growing Older

Most people live to old age, so it makes sense to face the reality of aging by preparing for it. Here are a few practical points to consider.

The Strange Protestant Bible of Henry VIII

An informative video on how our modern English Bibles come by the unlikely way of a King who was opposed to Protestantism.

ABOUT — The Sunday Reader shares articles we've found particularly insightful, thought-provoking, or edifying this week. While not always representing the views of our Pastors and Elders, these selections offer a mix of viewpoints to broaden and frame your understanding of God, Scripture, ourselves, and the world we serve in Christ's name.

The Sunday Reader: Vol. 1 | #30

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Be a Missionary, Not a Marketer

Christ taught his disciples to “go” into the world. This article leads you to ask whether churches are becoming overly dependent on passive, impersonal, or shallow methods of attracting outsiders to worship. In effect, saying, “come to us.”

Orphans in Mediterranean antiquity and Early Christianity

This scholarly article sheds historical light on James' call to practice “true religion.” It will give you a better sense of the challenged which early Christians confronted with costly compassion.

The Gospel and Solitude

Over at Ligonier, Donald Whitney meditates on the benefits of setting aside time to be alone with the Lord.

Should Christians Boycott Abusive Companies?

The short answer is that it's not black and white. But Clint Archer ventures to offer a longer response.

ABOUT — The Sunday Reader shares articles we've found particularly insightful, thought-provoking, or edifying this week. While not always representing the views of our Pastors and Elders, these selections offer a mix of viewpoints to broaden and frame your understanding of God, Scripture, ourselves, and the world we serve in Christ's name.

The Sunday Reader: Vol. 1 | #29

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Hospitality is War

This month, we jump back into hospitality lunches. Here's a stout reminder of the importance and joys of practicing hospitality in all of life. HT: Nicol P.

Is it a Waste of Time for Seminary Students and Pastors to Learn the Biblical Languages?

This might help settle any doubts you might have about the value and necessity of future pastors investing so much time, effort, and money acquiring Greek and Hebrew fluency. Also, it might encourage a few robust souls to take up the mantel and become better equipped students of the Word.

How Can I Best Prepare Students to Live Their Faith out in Public Schools? (video)

Al Mohler tackles the question. Much of this applies to students in private and homeschool, too.

What I've Learned About Leviticus After Studying it for Over a Decade

This is a worthy reflection on the benefits to be reaped from a close, continual study of this often misunderstood and imposing section of Scripture.

ABOUT — The Sunday Reader shares articles we've found particularly insightful, thought-provoking, or edifying this week. While not always representing the views of our Pastors and Elders, these selections offer a mix of viewpoints to broaden and frame your understanding of God, Scripture, ourselves, and the world we serve in Christ's name.

The Sunday Reader: Vol. 1 | #28

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The Winged Women of Zech 5

As a follow-up to last week's sermon, here's some biblical and archeological background for understanding what those winged women probably represent.

The Church Needs Fewer Men Who Feel “Called” to the Ministry

“We need fewer men who feel “called to ministry” and more men who aspire to the office of elder. But if we dump the language of calling, how do we know if we should pursue ministry?” Here are five indicators.

I Am Not My Own

A beautiful recollection of a life well lived, Orlena Lynn Boyle (1922-2018) was a missionary to Japan and China. Especially recommended for women and girls interested in foreign missions.

What Calvinists And Arminians Can Agree On

Despite their stated beliefs, most of those who do not profess to be Calvinistic nonetheless agree on this: we should pray for the salvation of others.

ABOUT — The Sunday Reader shares articles we've found particularly insightful, thought-provoking, or edifying this week. While not always representing the views of our Pastors and Elders, these selections offer a mix of viewpoints to broaden and frame your understanding of God, Scripture, ourselves, and the world we serve in Christ's name.

This Day in Christian History: St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre

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The St. Bartholomew's Day massacre in 1572 was a targeted group of assassinations and a wave of Catholic mob violence, directed against the Huguenots (French Calvinist Protestants) during the French Wars of Religion. Traditionally believed to have been instigated by Queen Catherine de' Medici, the mother of King Charles IX, the massacre took place a few days after the wedding day (18 August) of the king's sister Margaret to the Protestant Henry III of Navarre (the future Henry IV of France). Many of the most wealthy and prominent Huguenots had gathered in largely Catholic Paris to attend the wedding.

The massacre began in the night of 23–24 August 1572 (the eve of the feast of Bartholomew the Apostle), two days after the attempted assassination of Admiral Gaspard de Coligny, the military and political leader of the Huguenots. The king ordered the killing of a group of Huguenot leaders, including Coligny, and the slaughter spread throughout Paris. Lasting several weeks, the massacre expanded outward to other urban centers and the countryside. Modern estimates for the number of dead across France vary widely, from 5,000 to 30,000.

Author Unknown
HT: Nick V.

The Winged Women of Zech 5:9-11

In Zechariah's seventh vision, the prophet beholds “winged women” carrying a basket to the land of Shinar. Some interpreters have, I think mistakenly, taken these as proof of female angels. However, several things should be noted to the contrary.

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First, the beings are pictured carrying out an evil act. They take the basket containing a personification of wickedness itself to Shinar (Babylon), apparently to be set on a religious pedestal in a temple “house” constructed specifically for it. Whatever these beings are, they promote idolatry of the worst kind.

Secondly, the women have stork wings. Storks were among the birds proscribed as “unclean” according to the Old Covenant, under which Zechariah lived. The prophet would have sensed something unholy about the women.

Finally, archeologists have uncovered artifacts like the Burney Relief, believed to represent the goddess Ishtar as a winged woman. Such objects of false worship found in and around Shinar suggest that Zechariah would have understood the creatures to portray demonically-inspired religion propping up evil.

The Sunday Reader: Vol. 1 | #27

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The Holy Spirit's Ministry

"Our conviction is that God purposefully gave some gifts (specifically the ability to work miracles, the gift of revelatory prophecy, and speaking in tongues) only for a limited period."

When You Pray With Your Children, You Teach Them to Pray

Here's a touching reflection on how our children learn from observing our spiritual life. 

A Cup of Tea, Under a Bridge, In Jesus' Name

This article recounts the journey of a North African Muslim migrant who came to faith through the hospitality of a missionary family.

Common Questions Christians Ask About Forgiveness

Exactly as described.

ABOUT — The Sunday Reader shares articles we've found particularly insightful, thought-provoking, or edifying this week. While not always representing the views of our Pastors and Elders, these selections offer a mix of viewpoints to broaden and frame your understanding of God, Scripture, ourselves, and the world we serve in Christ's name.